Gate Decisions

A disciplined gate process is required to make effective decisions on whether to compete for business and can help organizations increase their win probability.

Introduction

Best Practices

1. Make a series of gate decisions.

In the effective pursuit of new and recompete business in the national government or commercial space, bid decisions, or gate decisions, are critical. Bid decisions are meant to eliminate opportunities or sales leads with a low win probability, thus permitting a stronger focus on opportunities with a higher win probability. Given finite resources and the cost of booking business, organizations should pursue only those opportunities that have a reasonable probability of win.

These important concepts drive successful gate-decision processes:

  • Organizations view gate decisions as critical to successful business development (BD) and revenue generation.
  • Decisions to continue pursuits or abandon opportunities are made at the gate-decision reviews.
  • opportunities are qualified by analyzing the customer’s needs, our capabilities for solving the customer’s problems, and how we match up against expected competition.
  • Gate decisions have a regular schedule on the organizational calendar that people understand and adhere to.
  • A formal team is established and tailored to the value and risk of the bid. This may be called a bid board or business acquisition panel at larger companies, or it may be simply a few defined individuals in smaller settings. This team participates in all gate decisions and has direct responsibility for business acquisition decision success.
  • All gate decisions focus on answering three basic questions about a business opportunity:
    • Is it real?
    • Can we win?
    • Do we want to?

Gate decisions must be organized to achieve organizational objectives related to winning business and managing the cost of winning business. Gate decisions are normally organized around the following milestones related to business opportunities:

Market entry decisions, while part of the end-to-end BD process, happen as part of the market identification and segmentation process and generally don’t relate to specific opportunities.

Success revolves around making a firm decision at each gate, either to proceed or to stop. These decisions are essential to business development health because they stop investment early in engagements that organizations have a low probability of winning. Gate decisions are essential to improving win probability and win rate.

a. Use the opportunity qualification decision to confirm whether the opportunity merits expending resources for research and assessment.

The table below documents the overall objective, key decisions, decision makers, inputs, outputs, and resource allocations for the opportunity qualification decision. This decision is sometimes made at the sales management level.

DECISION ASPECT EXPLANATION
Overall Objective Determine whether the opportunity merits expending resources for research and assessment, initiating the opportunity assessment phase
Key Decisions Assign opportunity owner to serve as lead; proceed to opportunity assessment phase to further qualify the opportunity
Owner/Organizer Opportunity/Capture Manager: Lead individual who found the lead or owner of the account for opportunity/capture assessment
Decision Makers As prescribed in organization’s BD process; usually varies by value, complexity, and risk of opportunity
Participants Opportunity/Capture Manager and identified decision makers
Input Opportunity/capture plan at opportunity qualification level or similar opportunity/capture briefing package
Resources Allocated (as required and scaled for setting) Opportunity/Capture Manager (could be lead originator), staff support for opportunity assessment, funding for opportunity/capture research (preliminary customer analysis and competitive assessment)
Decision Outcome Qualified (proceed to opportunity/capture assessment phase) or cancelled (no-bid)

This table illustrates the questions that are appropriate as part of the opportunity qualification decision.

DECISION ASPECT QUESTIONS
Opportunity Overview Is the opportunity funded, or is there a funding source? Does the potential project have an owner within the customer organization? Do we know the owner? What is the customer’s perception of us?
Business Case Is the opportunity in a high-probability quadrant (current service/current client)? Do we have adequate BD and technical resources to develop the opportunity? Do we want to win? Are there acceptable profit margins or other strategic reasons for wanting to win? Does the opportunity conflict with other work being performed or anticipated?
Opportunity Fit with Your Plans Does this opportunity support our strategic plan? Business plan? Account plan?
Positioning Overview Does the customer know us? Do they know that we’re considering this opportunity? Are we the incumbent? If not, have we been actively calling on the customer?
Background, Mission, and Roles Do we understand the customer’s mission?
Competing Teams and Approaches Do we know who the potential competitors are likely to be? Can we team with a competitor if necessary?

b. Use the pursuit decision to determine whether to commit resources to developing opportunity/capture plans and influencing the customer to prefer your solution.

The table below documents the overall objective, key decisions, decision makers, inputs, outputs, and resource allocations for the pursuit decision.

DECISION ASPECT PURSUIT DECISION
Overall Objective Determine whether to commit resources to developing opportunity/capture plans and influencing the customer to prefer our solution, initiating the opportunity/capture planning phase; sales should make an opportunity qualification decision before this decision gate
Key Decisions Decide whether to proceed to opportunity/capture planning; determine the funding level for remaining phases and total pursuit; assign an Opportunity/Capture Manager and identify a core opportunity team and support
Owner/Organizer Opportunity Lead
Decision Makers As prescribed in organization’s BD process; usually varies by value, complexity, and risk of opportunity
Participants Opportunity Lead and identified decision makers
Input Opportunity/capture plan at bid pursuit decision level of detail or similar bid pursuit briefing package (expanded from opportunity qualification), opportunity budget request
Resources Allocated (as required and scaled for setting) Opportunity/Capture Manager, core opportunity/capture team staffing, core opportunity team funding, and core opportunity/capture team facilities and materials (as needed)
Decision Outcome Pursuit approved (proceed to opportunity/capture planning phase) or cancelled (no-bid)

This table illustrates the questions that are appropriate as part of the pursuit decision.

DECISION ASPECT QUESTIONS
Strategy and Solution Overview Have we developed a credible win strategy that can be clearly articulated? Do we have a conceptual solution with clear discriminators?
Decision Makers, Issues/Hot Buttons DDo we know the key decision makers and their issues and hot buttons? Do the key decision makers know us?
Contractor Role and Responsibilities Do we have a clear understanding of our anticipated role? Are there any potential conflicts of interest?
Opportunity Fit with Your Plans Is this opportunity still aligned with the strategic plan, business plan, or account plan?
Your Competitive Position How well do the opportunity requirements match our competencies?
Your Solution Overview Has a solution been developed? Are there any significant gaps?
Risk Assessment Are there significant bid risks? Is the performance risk level acceptable?
Leveraging Strengths Have we identified actions to improve our probability of a win? Is progress being made in executing these actions?
Mitigating Weaknesses Are there plans in place to mitigate weaknesses?
Price-to-Win Analysis Do we have sufficient knowledge of the customer and the competition to develop a realistic price to win?

c. Use the bid/no-bid decision to determine if you’ve positioned yourself favorably enough to justify planning to develop a proposal.

The following table documents the overall objective, key decisions, decision makers, inputs, outputs, and resource allocations for the bid/no-bid decision.

DECISION ASPECT BID/NO-BID DECISION
Overall Objective Determine whether you’ve positioned yourself favorably enough to justify planning to develop a proposal, initiating the proposal planning phase
Key Decisions Decide whether to proceed to the proposal planning phase; confirm/adjust the win strategy, pricing, solution, win themes, and discriminators; adjust, as needed, funding for all remaining phases; assign a Proposal Manager; and assign the preliminary proposal team
Owner/Organizer Opportunity/Capture Manager
Decision Makers As prescribed in organization’s BD process; usually varies by value, complexity, and risk of opportunity
Participants Opportunity/Capture Manager and identified decision makers
Input Opportunity/capture plan at bid/no-bid decision level of detail or similar bid/no-bid briefing package (expanded from bid pursuit); proposal budget request; opportunity/capture template or bid decision tree
Resources Allocated (as required and scaled for setting) Proposal Manager, core proposal team staffing (internal and external), core proposal team funding, proposal team facilities and materials (as needed), review team funding and staffing
Decision Outcome Bid/no-bid approved (proceed to proposal planning phase), improvement needed to opportunity plan, or cancelled (no-bid)

This table illustrates the questions that are appropriate as part of the bid/no-bid decision.

DECISION ASPECT QUESTIONS
Deliverables and Schedule In the absence of a DRFP or SOW, do we have a clear understanding of the deliverables and the schedule? If so, how?
Evaluation Process Are we sure of the evaluation process to be used? If so, how do we know?
Competitor Overviews Do we have an accurate picture of the prospect’s perception of competitors?
Bidder Comparison Has an objective bidder comparison been completed?
Teaming and Subcontracting Do we have firm commitments from needed teammates?
Past Performance Baseline Do we have strong, relevant past performance?
Management Solution How does our management approach provide added value?
Technical Solution How does the technical solution provide added value and discriminators?
Gap Analysis Can all remaining gaps be filled? How?
Discriminators, Themes Are discriminators unique and interesting to the prospect? Can the prospect justify our selection based on our discriminators and cost?
Price-to-Win Analysis Has the price-to-win been determined? Is it acceptable to senior management?
Opportunity/Capture/Proposal Schedule and Status Is the customer adhering to the expected schedule? If not, why? Have we confirmed customer budget?

d. Use the bid validation decision to determine whether the opportunity is still worth pursuing and the proposal is worth preparing, considering the final details in the RFP.

The following table documents the overall objective, key decisions, decision makers, inputs, outputs, and resource allocations for the bid-validation decision.

DECISION ASPECT BID VALIDATION DECISION
Overall Objective Determine whether the opportunity is still worth pursuing and the proposal is worth preparing, considering the final details in the request for proposals, initiating the proposal development phase
Key Decisions Decide whether to proceed to the proposal development phase; confirm/adjust win strategy, pricing, solution, win themes, and discriminators; adjust, as needed, funding for remaining phases; resolve proposal staffing and any other critical issues
Owner/Organizer Opportunity Manager
Decision Makers As prescribed in organization’s BD process; usually varies by value, complexity, and risk of opportunity
Participants Opportunity/Capture Manager and identified decision makers
Input Opportunity plan at bid validation decision level of detail or similar bid validation briefing package (expanded from bid/no-bid pursuit), updated proposal budget (if applicable), confirmed teaming agreements
Resources Allocated (as required and scaled for setting) Proposal team staffing (internal and external), proposal team funding, review team funding and staffing, proposal team facilities for FPR (as needed)
Decision Outcome Proceed to bid approved or cancelled (no-bid)

This table illustrates the questions that are appropriate as part of the bid-validation decision.

DECISION ASPECT QUESTIONS
Terms and Funding Commitments Are the published RFP terms as anticipated, and are they still acceptable? Does the RFP show evidence of being influenced by competitors? Based on the published evaluation criteria, can the customer justify selecting your company?
Technical Requirements/Verification Are the technical requirements in the RFP as anticipated? Has our technical approach been reviewed and verified as being acceptable to the prospect? Are team (teammate) roles clearly defined and formally agreed on?
Business Solution Does our business solution provide significant value and return on investment to the customer? Has a draft executive summary been prepared? Is it persuasive?
Cost Estimate Has a bottom-up cost estimate been completed? Can the solution be profitably delivered within the price-to-win?
Issues and Recommendations Have all internal issues related to the opportunity been addressed and resolved? Is the resource estimate still valid with acceptable impact?

e. Use the final review to determine whether to submit the proposal prepared, considering the anticipated financial reward and level of risk.

The following table documents the overall objective, key decisions, decision makers, inputs, outputs, and resource allocations for the final review (business case/senior management review).

DECISION ASPECT FINAL REVIEW
Overall Objective Determine whether to submit the proposal prepared, considering the anticipated financial reward and level of risk
Key Decisions Decide whether to submit the proposal to the customer; confirm project management and staffing for project start-up; confirm all preparations for orals, demonstration, and contract negotiations
Owner/Organizer Opportunity/Capture Manager
Decision Makers As prescribed in organization’s BD process; usually varies by value, complexity, and risk of opportunity
Participants Opportunity/Capture Manager and identified decisionmakers
Input Opportunity/capture plan at business case-decision level of detail or business case-briefing package, updated budget (if applicable)
Resources Allocated (as required and scaled for setting) Orals/demonstration team staffing (internal and external) if required, orals/demonstration team funding if required, funding and staffing for any necessary start-up activities, negotiating team
Decision Outcome Submit bid or no-bid

This table illustrates the questions that are appropriate as part of the final review decision.

DECISION ASPECT QUESTIONS
Proposal Is the proposal compliant, responsive, competitive, and priced to win? Does the proposal meet corporate quality standards?
Risk Assessment Are there any unresolved elements of risk that should preclude submitting the proposal? Will the proposal be evaluated as being low risk to the customer?
Negotiation Plan: The Customer Is the contract likely to be awarded without negotiation? If so, are we prepared to accept this? If negotiations occur, do we know who in the customer organization will be leading them? Is the customer under any constraints (e.g., time) that we can leverage?
Negotiation Plan: Our Team Has our negotiating team been identified? Is our negotiating position clearly defined and agreed to by senior management?
Closure Plan Is the Program Manager/Implementation Lead ready to begin delivery immediately upon award?

2. Standardize company templates and schedules.

Standardized templates and schedules promote effective decisionmaking. Meeting dates are known, expectations are set, and information to be presented for the decision is defined and understood.

Templates for these reviews are generally created in presentation or word processing software. Presentation-format reviews facilitate rapid and consensus-based decisionmaking. Often, the presentation material is distributed ahead of the review so people can come prepared with questions requiring resolution and discussion. Presentation software works equally well in face-to-face or virtual settings.

In large organizations, gate decisions are generally scheduled for a consistent day, time, and location. A designated scheduler will often create the agenda of reviews for the day. Many large organizations set aside a day or a half-day for these reviews and allocate them in half-hour to one-hour increments. In small organizations, gate decisions may be made individually based on an opportunity-driven schedule. While gate decisions in small organizations may be less formal, they are no less important.

An opportunity/capture plan template is used for developing the opportunity plan and making gate decisions. As analysis of the opportunity progresses through the review and gate-decision process, the level of detail in the plan increases. This concept is illustrated in the next section.

3. Set expectations for information maturation across the gate-decision cycle.

Effective gate-decision processes acknowledge that with the right actions taken by the opportunity/capture team, information quality on an opportunity increases over time. For example, the quality of information at the qualification decision is about 25 percent of that expected at a bid validation.

Organizations must set reasonable expectations for information quality and maturity at various gate decisions. These expectations must be understood by presenters and reviewers.

Information for gate decisions should be collected continuously throughout the bid process. As the opportunity matures, more information is expected to be found and analyzed for the opportunity. The following table reflects the nominal detail expected across the lifecycle. As you can see, at early stages, few pieces of content have been produced. As the process continues, content is added and evolves from concept to its final, detailed form.

CONTENT Opportunity Qualification Bid Pursuit BID/NO-BID BID VALIDATION
Timing Soon after opportunity is identified Initiation and funding of formal opportunity planning Opportunity plan is substantially completed Receipt of RFP or initiation of proposal preparation
Executive Summary Concept Detail Additional Detail Additional Detail
Opportunity Description Concept Detail Additional Detail Additional Detail
Customer Profile Concept Detail Additional Detail Additional Detail
Customer Issues/Hot Buttons Concept Detail Additional Detail
Customer Budget Concept Concept Detail Additional Detail
Opportunity Details Concept Detail Additional Detail
Competitor Assessment Concept Detail Additional Detail
Competitive Position Assessment Concept Detail Additional Detail
win strategy Concept Detail Additional Detail
Teaming/Subcontracting Concept Detail Additional Detail
Price-to-Win Concept Detail Additional Detail
Solution Sets (Technical, Management, Past Performance) Concept Detail Additional Detail
Opportunity Risks Concept Detail Additional Detail
Customer Contact Plan Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing
Action Plans Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing

4. Determine bid and proposal investment.

Pursuing and winning business is not cheap. Most organizations aim to win as much revenue and profit as possible at the lowest possible cost.

Gate decisions often focus on “is it worth it?” Cost should always be determined based on what it will cost to win, not what it will cost to bid. Cost should include labor, other direct costs (consultants), travel, and incidentals required to develop and submit a winning bid.

5. Establish company-appropriate decision criteria.

Most organizations develop first-order decision criteria to help them rapidly eliminate opportunities that don’t contribute significantly to the organization’s annual and strategic business objectives.

Examples of these first-order metrics include:

  • Revenue
  • Strategic fit
  • Cost to win
  • Resources to win
  • Customer knowledge
  • Opportunity knowledge and funding
  • Company capability
  • Company experience/past performance
  • Growth potential
  • Time to solicitation/tender release
  • Probability of win
  • Probability of customer proceeding to award

6. Determine probability of win and probability of go.

Probability of win and probability of go are broad-based calculations of an organization’s likelihood of winning an opportunity. They are generally expressed as a percentage, or in some cases, by using adjectives such as high, medium, or low.

Probability of win has a broad set of parameters used to develop a calculation based on the customer’s perception of the bidding organization.

Parameters can include:

  • Pre-RFP activity designed to influence requirements
  • Customer preferences
  • Customer knowledge of the organization bidding
  • Technical capability
  • Management capability
  • Cost
  • Incumbency
  • Experience
  • Past performance
  • Risk

Probability of go represents the likelihood the customer will actually proceed with a funded program upon making an award decision.

Probability of go is usually assessed based on simple parameters, such as:

  • Mission need/requirement
  • Customer champion
  • Funding availability
  • Criticality

Industry-standard calculators can help with these analyses and are available from multiple sources. They may differ slightly in structure and parameters, but all have the same intent: to provide a first-order understanding of opportunity difficulty and value when it comes to winning.

7. Understand who is responsible for gate decisions.

The leadership and presentation role changes at gate decisions as the opportunity progresses. The opportunity team ultimately maintains responsibility, but at opportunity qualification, that will be only the business developer, marketer, or salesperson assigned to an account of a functional area.

For the pursuit, the assigned Opportunity/Capture Manager assumes the lead and generally maintains it through the final review.

8. Hold gate decisions at the right level.

Strike a balance between being able to adapt quickly in your market and ensuring that the right and various levels of management have the knowledge to be constructive and to advise on new business opportunities. Make decisions too low in your organization and critical oversight will be lacking. Make them too high and top executives will be micromanaging day-to-day operations rather than focusing on strategic planning and growth.

9. Plan gate decisions carefully.

Gate decisions should be planned, structured events, not ad hoc gatherings.

Categorize your opportunity. When in doubt, categorize the lead as more valuable, more strategic, and riskier. Avoid jeopardizing progress or approval because things turn out to be more complex than expected.

Invite the right people for the category. Omit people if you can’t define their role. Set clear expectations and standards for all attendees. Attendees must understand the purpose of the meeting and their roles.

Schedule decision gates early to improve the attendance of key participants. If key participants are unable to attend in person, add them virtually using video or audio teleconferencing. If their time is limited, ask them to join for the summary discussion, wrap-up, and recommendations. To simplify scheduling and improve senior management turnout, some organizations set standing gate decision dates and cover prepared opportunities in a single meeting, especially when simultaneously pursuing multiple opportunities.

Confirm that defined and required inputs are complete and available. Defined inputs typically vary by opportunity category. Executives frequently set minimum information thresholds and presentation templates for gate decision meetings.

Avoid developing a culture in which elaborate information packets are substitutes for the difficult and essential work of interacting with the customer and developing solid competitive intelligence. No gate decision package by itself is your objective. Your objective is to use gates to narrow your range of pursuits to the most winnable few.

Offer an honest recommendation on what decision is in the best interests of your company. Avoid the common trap of Opportunity/Capture Managers seeking approval for the next phase, regardless of the pursuit status. Sometimes your best approach is to convince management to redirect precious resources to more winnable opportunities.

10. Specify inputs and outputs for each gate decision.

Define mandatory and optional inputs and outputs for each gate decision by opportunity category. Adapt these by market, customer, and strategic importance. When presenters’ and participants’ expectations are aligned, everyone can focus on making sound decisions rather than debating what information is missing or who’s at fault.

For large, complex opportunities, most inputs come from your opportunity/capture plan. Opportunity/capture plans should evolve as opportunities progress, minimizing effort on early-stage pursuits that might not continue. Predetermine which opportunity/capture plan elements will be required for each gate decision.

For smaller, simpler opportunities, less comprehensive tools and inputs suffice. Your process may also require additional documentation at various gate decisions:

  • Opportunity assessments
  • Competitive intelligence summaries
  • Price-to-win analyses
  • Solution descriptions
  • Financial analyses
  • Teaming agreements
  • Review summaries

Decision gate outputs record the decisions made. To continually improve your opportunity/capture process, consider including critiques of the opportunity/capture team’s work, instructions for future actions, or conditions attached to approvals in the opportunity file.

11. Avoid overfocus on the technical solution.

Conduct a comprehensive appraisal of your full offer before making a decision. Consider not only your technical solution, but also your management approach, price, quality assurance plan, transition plan, and the relevant experience and past performance by which you will bolster credibility within your customer. Senior Managers often rise from technical backgrounds and are tempted to return to familiar territory.

Reduce reviewers’ focus on the technical solution by adopting some or all of these approaches:

  • Review and seek acceptance of the ground rules before beginning the meeting
  • Remind participants that they agreed to the ground rules
  • Suggest a separate review of the technical solution, identify who should participate, then set the time and place

If an executive refuses to continue without resolution of technical issues, you or the executive were ill-prepared for the decision gate. Reschedule when better information is available.

12. Continue the gate decision until management reaches a firm written decision.

When a decision gate is scheduled, push to a definitive conclusion—advance or end the pursuit. Defer as a last resort. Recognize that deferral usually means that you or other participants were ill-prepared.

Before deciding to advance, realistically scope the people, activities, and funding needed to position your organization to win. Unfortunately, opportunity/capture efforts are often underfunded, with good intentions but poor results. If you lack accurate opportunity/capture cost data from previous pursuits, plan opportunity/capture activities in detail, using the same approach you would for other service-based projects. Then track expenditures to improve future forecasts.

Don’t defer a decision because the answer seems unclear. Lack of clarity is a no-bid indicator. If you must defer, set a firm schedule for reconsideration. List the events or intelligence on which a decision will depend, then follow your agreed conditions.

Deferred decisions invariably have negative consequences:

  • Subsequent activities are postponed
  • Executives remember Opportunity/Capture Managers as unprepared due to information gaps
  • Opportunity/capture teams lose momentum when members delay completing assigned tasks because they sense management might end the pursuit
  • Managers returning to an unfinished review retain negative biases

13. Follow up on action items related to gate decisions.

Successful gate decisions depend on recording and following up on action items that fall out of gate-decision reviews. This affects opportunities receiving a “proceed” decision at the gate. Promptly record and disseminate decisions. To support subsequent analysis of gate decisions and to foster familiarity, develop a standard decision record for your organization. Include these key elements:

  • Date
  • Participants
  • Decisions
  • Recommendations
  • Commitments
  • Approved process deviations and extraordinary exceptions
  • Lessons learned

Usually, “proceed” comes with a series of critical actions that the review team or board and principal decision maker believe must be completed satisfactorily before the next review. These actions must be clearly defined, assigned, scheduled for completion, and resourced. A simple or complex action item tracking matrix can be used to track objectives.

At the next review, reviews should begin by reviewing open action items. Figure 1 provides an overview of gate decisions and the end-to-end BD process.

Figure 1. Gate Decisions and the BD Lifecycle.

Figure 1. Gate Decisions and the BD Lifecycle. Following a structured gate-decision process improves BD success.

Collect and record lessons learned after each gate decision. Waiting until the end of the pursuit leads to lessons lost. After the proposal is submitted or the contract is finalized, you will have forgotten numerous events and their causes, will have limited motivation, will likely be reassigned to another task already, and could be biased by your win or loss.

Common Pitfalls and Misconceptions

Avoid these common misconceptions to improve your overall gate-decision performance:

  • All opportunity information is known at the beginning of the cycle. Set information maturity expectations for each review.
  • Strategy should remain static throughout decisions. win strategy is key and should be reassessed at every review.
  • You can’t win a low probability of win deals if you start early. The right actions can make a low probability of win deals into a high probability of win deals.
  • You can’t lose a high probability of win deals if you start late. A late start equals lower probability of win.
  • Probability of go has no value in the decision to pursue or not. If a bid doesn’t generate revenue, you can’t gain ROI.
  • Resourcing is unimportant in probability-of-win calculations. Subpar teams do not often win.
  • Gates can be treated as reviews rather than decision points. Deferring decisions wastes time and money.
  • Gate-decision quality is not indicative of probability of win. Strategy rules. Bad strategy is often associated with low probability of win.
  • Price-to-win can come late in the gate process. Competitive pricing strategy must come early to match the solution presented.

Summary

  • Use gate decisions to control progression through business development phases.
  • Include relevant roles and limit nonessential participants at gate decisions.
  • Hold gate decision with the right level of senior management involvement.
  • Plan decision gates carefully.
  • Specify inputs and outputs for each gate decision.
  • Avoid overfocus on the technical solution.
  • Continue the gate decision until management reaches a firm decision.
  • Be prepared to end the pursuit.
  • Eliminate personal opinion, bias, and ego.
  • Record the decision, update the opportunity/capture plan, archive the information, and document lessons learned.
  • Gate decisions are a key component of the business development lifecycle.
  • Gate decisions prevent businesses from unnecessarily expending resources on bid they have a low probability of winning.
  • Consistent decision criteria can help organizations make decisions effectively.
  • Two important criteria are probability of win and probability of go, or the likelihood that a customer will actually proceed with a funded program upon making an award decision.

Terms to Know

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